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What is the benefit of using Artifacts for Teacher Evaluations?

In teacher evaluations it may be impossible to demonstrate a proficiency through a lesson that is being observed, but that proficiency can be demonstrated through artifacts. An example might be Family Communication. An administrator is unable to observe that on a classroom visit. However, a teacher can provide a Parent Communication Log as an artifact to show that Family Communication. An artifact is evidence, the same as classroom observation facts.

Points of Reflective Teaching

  • Teachers should have the primary responsibility for collecting and uploading acceptable artifacts. It is recommended that the administrator/evaluator let the teacher know for which domains artifacts are needed. For instance, for an Instruction domain, no artifacts may be needed. The administrator can see that during the classroom visit. However, for the Leadership domain, artifacts may be needed.
  • Teachers should not create artifacts specifically for this artifact review; instead, teachers should use samples of documents that occur as part of their everyday practices.
  • Artifact evidence must meet criteria for validity, appropriateness, completeness, and consistency.
  • Step 1: Identify the standard, indicator, element, or goal that the artifact addresses.
  • Step 2: Describe the artifact and identify the section that directly connects to the standard, indicator, element, or goal.
  • Step 3: Highlight the artifact’s impact on student learning.
  • Step 4: Specify the evidence of professional growth or proficiency in the standard, indicator, element the artifact provides.
  • Step 5: Upload the artifact and make available to the administrator

Best Practices Recommendations:

  • Upload as you go. It is recommended uploading artifacts over the course of the year, rather than all at once, as a strategy for time management. Teachers may be given timelines for submission for different domains. Spread out submission throughout the school year.
  • Quality matters more than quantity. Evaluators report that high quality artifacts with clear rationales that reflect a direct impact on student learning provide far more insight for evaluation than numerous artifacts without clear rationales.
  • Representative Evidence. Artifacts should reflect a scope of evidence that is appropriate for interpretation. For example, a sampling of student work or analysis of the performance of a group of students provides more robust evidence than a single student’s work.

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